Firms Or Governments Use The Internet To Spy On Us. Should We Care?

Our growing reliance on the Internet and smart tech mean we see more than ever. Is this a war thing – or is our perception of privacy still outdated?

The news of the death of privacy is nothing new. In 1890, signalled by Kodak cameras’ deep-seated hatred for the invasion of social privacy, “American lawyers Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren wrote an influential tract entitled Right to Privacy, which ranged between personal and public boundaries. Tried to clarify. Circle

For most of us, privacy is necessary to an extent, even if we struggle with it. “Privacy is far from dying,” says Jennifer Crockberg, a digital anthropologist at the University of Hamburg, Germany. “It is a necessity of existence, a state in which we feel safe, comfortable and secure.”

In the Internet age, privacy attacks come in two important directions. First, large parts of the web have been engineered by commercial companies to monitor each of their online initiatives in the name of profitability: earning billions by selling ads targeting Google, Facebook, and the like. We may not even be aware of. Second, governments and other public agencies have begun to take advantage of large-scale Internet surveillance tools in the name of better public safety.

Example, we can all debate whether to buy under surveillance or not. If we do, our reward better services, whether the results of better results or more relevant recommendations. However, in practice, the monopoly positions of some major tech companies make it difficult for you to avoid giving up your data, and we have only initial control over that…

 

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